# Project Organization Contact Status Amount
1564 Spanning the Jordan River - Chestonia Bridge Project

The Chestonia Bridge state access site on the Jordan River is actually comprised of twin 14 foot wide culverts that cause stream velocities to increase five-fold, and contribute to pool formation, streambank erosion, sediment accumulation, and over widening of the river. Jordan River partners have completed design, and are going to build a 90 foot long single span bridge that will accomodate natural channel conditinos, and provide passage for all aquatic species at all life stages.

Board Decision Year: 2015
Conservation Resource Alliance - Grandview Plaza Building (Traverse City) Balke, Kimberly (kim@rivercare.org) Completed $100,000.00
1563 Belle Isle Access to Fishing – Boat Club Pier

The purpose of this project was to develop engineering plans and a cost estimate for the renovation/rehabilitation of the Boat Club Pier to improve fishing access at Belle Isle Park in Detroit, Michigan.  The scope for design of the project also included parking lot improvements, bridge replacement, lighting, walkway construction and the filling of dilapidated swimming pools to ensure safe access to the pier.  The project officially kicked off in 2015.  The final engineering documents for the pier were developed and delivered to the DNR in December, 2016.  A final cost estimate was also developed to guide future fundraising efforts for implementation of the construction phase of the project.

Board Decision Year: 2012
Michigan Department of Natural Resources - Parks and Recreation Division (Lansing) Lincoln, Matt (lincolnm@michigan.gov) Completed $73,160.61
1562 North Branch White River Culvert Removal

The project removed the final (culvert) barrier in the North Branch of the White River. Fifteen river miles were opened, making the North Branch navigable for the first time since the logging era. A timber bridge spanning the bankfull width was installed and the river has returned to its natural channel.

Board Decision Year: 2015
Oceana County Road Commission (Hart) Dutcher, Lisa (lisa_dutcher@hotmail.com) Completed $80,000.00
1561 Barrier Removal Decision Support – A User-Driven Collaborative Modeling Suite

Funded in part by the Great Lakes Fishery Trust, the Barrier Removal Collaborative Suite (BRCS) is a collaborative web platform that contains interactive mapping; standardized and current water, barrier, and invasive species data sets; and mechanisms for users to post comments, preferences, priorities, data, and plans. The platform allows users to share their views on water barriers and tributaries, comment on individual posts, create topics to discuss, and form shared interest groups to collaborate on barriers. The BRCS can also serve as a decision support tool that allows users to draw on the tool’s maps, save their individual project plans, as well as import plans created by other users in the BRCS. The main goal of the tool is to allow stakeholders to work in a cooperative online environment and provide a decision support tool based on the best available data. The project team integrated a survey mechanism into the BRCS that allows users to rank important areas and reach a consensus around those areas. Using data from the survey mechanism, the BRCS creates a grid heat map that shows the amount of agreement or disagreement around a particular area. These areas are designated as “Consensus Levels”. The tool is available for use here: http://brcs.seasketch.org/

Board Decision Year: 2015
Great Lakes Fishery Commission (Ann Arbor) Hrodey, Peter (phrodey@glfc.org) Completed $150,000.00
1552 Comparison of otolith microchemistry between juvenile steelhead cohabitant resident fish species

Natural reproduction of salmonids in Lake Michigan tributaries is substantial and otolith microchemistry is likely to allow for the identification of their natal origin. Interannual variation necessitates yearly derivation of tributary-specific chemical signatures in order to reliably assign origin. Inference of otolith chemistry to salmonid species from cosmopolitan resident species could substantially reduce sampling efforts and costs. Central Michigan University' Department of Biology and Institute for Great Lakes Research will assess whether otolith chemistry signatures of juvenile salmonids differ substantially from other common, river-resident species.

Board Decision Year: 2015
Central Michigan University - Department of Biology and Institute for Great Lakes Research (Mount Pleasant) Pangle, Kevin (pangl1k@cmich.edu) Completed $119,268.13
1550 The New Lake Michigan Food Web: Establishing links between nearshore food sources and pelagic piscivores.

With funding from the Great Lakes Fishery Trust, The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Great Lakes WATER Institute attempted to better characterize the diets of large-bodied piscivores in Lake Michigan following major ecosystem changes in the past 10-15 years. The project aimed to address the following questions:


  1. Does the ability to utilize nearshore energy sources vary among species?

  2. Within a given species, does the dependence on nearshore energy sources vary with location?

  3. Do spatial and temporal differences in dependence on nearshore energy lead to differences in fish condition?

The project offers important insights into upper food web structure and energy flow of Lake Michigan salmonines diets. The study fills previous knowledge gaps surrounding the diets of brown trout, Coho salmon, and steelhead and provides evidence of how the salmonines have adjusted their diet after ecosystem changes such as the establishment of the dreissenid mussels and the round goby in the Lake Michigan food web. In addition to providing dietary data for certain species, the project also generated the first estimates of niche overlap and diet proportion data for the Lake Michigan piscivore community. The data provide important insight into the upper food web structure and potential interaction among species. The project represents one of the larger databases of fatty acid profiles at the top of a freshwater food web.  

Board Decision Year: 2015
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee - Great Lakes WATER Institute (Milwaukee) Bootsma, Harvey (hbootsma@uwm.edu) Completed $264,772.30
1546 Forecasting biological and economic impacts of aquatic invasive species in Lake Michigan

University of Wyoming - Economics and Finance will use dynamically linked ecosystem and economic models to forecast both the bioeconomic impacts of future invasive species on Lake Michigan’s food web and fisheries, and the impacts of potential invasive species management strategies. They will predict changes in fishery effort, harvests and regional economic well-being resulting from changes in fish biomass caused by invasive species and management strategies.

Board Decision Year: 2015
University of Wyoming - Economics and Finance (Laramie) Finnoff, David (finnoff@uwyo.edu) Active $246,819.16
1539 Management unit delineation of lake sturgeon populations based on adaptive genetic diversity

Lake sturgeon management units have been delineated based on neutral genetic markers; however, these markers may not represent adaptive differences that may indicate different evolutionary pathways for these populations. In this project, lake sturgeon populations throughout the Great Lakes will be analyzed at genes that are under natural selection. Populations will then be grouped based on adaptive similarity, resulting in management units that will help conserve the adaptive potential of our remaining lake sturgeon populations.

Board Decision Year: 2015
West Virginia University Research Corporation (Morgantown) Welsh, Amy (amy.welsh@mail.wvu.edu) Active $193,942.00
1531 Making fish and habitat survey data publicly available to facilitate collaborative management of Great Lakes tributaries

In 2002, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Fisheries Division initiated a statewide Status and Trends Program (STP) to assess fish populations and aquatic habitat in Michigan rivers. A key component of the STP was an inventory of streams throughout Michigan using a stratified-random sampling design and standardized survey methods. Data from these surveys and other surveys done using the STP Random Site protocols can be used to characterize various types of streams and stream habitats throughout Michigan. The information needed for characterization benchmarks existed in MDNR databases for the entire state of Michigan; however, the data was not readily available to citizens and fishery managers in a user-friendly manager. With support from the GLFT, the MDNR Fisheries Division contracted the expertise needed to create the Stream Evaluator for assembling the collected data and displaying them in a user-friendly manner.  The tool characterizes benchmark conditions of fish population composition, species abundance, and habitat conditions for each stream type in Michigan. The Stream Data Evaluator will be updated annually with the latest data from the MDNR Fisheries Division survey database conducted using the MDNR STP Random Site protocols. The Stream Evaluator is available here: http://www.mcgi.state.mi.us/smdt/

Board Decision Year: 2015
Michigan Department of Natural Resources - Marquette Fisheries Research Station (Marquette) Zorn, Troy (zornt@michigan.gov) Completed $71,245.00
1517 Classroom With a Current Watershed Education at the Grand Rapids Public Museum

The Grand Rapids Public Museum "Classroom with a Current" program provided an opportunity for thousands of students to experience inquiry-based learning with a focus on the Great Lakes. Programs were designed to provide information that assisted students in becoming (1) active and effective stewards of the Great Lakes and (2) advocates for strategies that support the long-term sustainability of the Great Lakes fisheries. Programming included new museum-based field trip programs, summer camp experiences, an after-school program, and a youth watershed team. The highest level of engagement was through the summer camp experiences and field trip-based programs.

Board Decision Year: 2015
Grand Rapids Public Museum Foundation - Collections & Education (Grand Rapids) Schulz, Gina (gschulz@grmuseum.org) Completed $99,980.00
1515 Vernal Pools: Place-based Education and Stewardship

The project is complete. During the grant period, the Vernal Pool Patrol, a statewide citizen science- and place-based vernal pool mapping and monitoring program, was adapted for K-12 educators and students, primarily at the upper elementary, middle and high school levels, to get involved with the program. A total of 18 teachers/educators and over 740 upper elementary, middle, and high school students from 13 different schools across northern Michigan were trained and participated in the Vernal Pool Patrol pilot program between 2015 and 2017. Over 25 community partners also assisted the teachers and students and participated in the pilot program. All the teachers who participated in the program and the evaluation said that they would recommend the program to other teachers. The teachers also said that the students enjoyed and were highly engaged in the program. A web-based platform (i.e., Google form) was developed for students to enter, view, and download their vernal pool monitoring data as well as data collected by students monitoring other vernal pools in the project area. The Vernal Pool Patrol pilot program provided additional information on vernal pools and increased our knowledge and understanding of their status, distribution, and ecology in Michigan. At least 20 new vernal pools were identified, mapped, and monitored by the educators and students. Fairy shrimp, which only live in vernal pools, was found by the students in at least eight of the vernal pools that were monitored, including perhaps the first documentation of fairy shrimp in a wooded dune and swale natural community. The program resulted in significant increases in awareness and understanding of vernal pools and an increase in attitudes towards stewardship. It resulted in new collaborations with a number of teachers, students, and community partners, including the GLSI, and stronger and expanded existing partnerships for MNFI in the project area.

Board Decision Year: 2015
Michigan State University Extension - Michigan Natural Features Inventory (Lansing) Lee, Yu Man (leeyum@msu.edu) Completed $90,000.00
1514 Tip of the Mitt Watershed Academy

The Watershed Academy engaged and supported students from Northern Michigan high schools in water quality monitoring experiences. Students were provided with tools and knowledge to collect water quality data and assess stream health in the local watershed to foster an attitude of stewardship. Watershed Academy students worked in small groups to become experts and share their findings with classmates, school and community. Data collected at stream sites was entered into a database used to inform and prepare communities to tackle tough management issues such as invasive species management, habitat restoration and water quality in the future.

Board Decision Year: 2015
Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council (Petoskey) Buchanan, Jennifer (jen@watershedcouncil.org) Completed $39,950.00
1508 Conducting a Condition Assessment of Nearshore Fish Habitat in the Great Lakes Basin

This proposal included the three following tasks: A) Compile and summarize appropriate and available datasets; B) Identify the classification framework to be used and develop fish habitat classification; and C) Conduct Nearshore and Coastal Habitat Condition Assessment. The research team decided to divide the assessment into two parts, a Coastal and a Nearshore Assessment, in part due to the different types of data that were available and in part due to data availability and sharing constraints. The two assessments are conducted on different parts of the coastal and nearshore zones: Coastal includes habitat from 0-3 m deep and the Nearshore extends from 3 to 30 m deep (15 m in Lake Erie). The two teams coordinated throughout the project and identified a broad assessment approach that both teams followed (Fig. 1); however, due to different spatial scales and data types, the teams used zone-specific analytical approaches and fish metrics. In general, we also agreed that abundance data were preferred if possible. 

Board Decision Year: 2014
The Regents of the University of Michigan - School of Natural Resources and Environment (Ann Arbor) Riseng, Catherine (criseng@umich.edu) Completed $216,603.07
1501 Growing and Sustaining Great Lakes Restoration Successes

The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes (HOW) Coalition is improving the health of the Great Lakes through their project “Growing and Sustaining Great Lakes Restoration Successes” which addresses historic threats to the Lakes through on the ground restoration work. The project will provide capacity building grants to local and state non-profit organizations in eight priority areas across the Great Lakes region to help them successfully implement restoration projects through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)

Board Decision Year: 2014
National Wildlife Federation - Great Lakes Regional Office (Ann Arbor) Hill, Jennifer (hillj@nwf.org) Completed $99,999.60
1500 Restoring the Natural Divide: Technical Support to Develop a Long-Term Solution for Preventing the Movement of Aquatic Invasive Species in the Chicago Area Waterway System

The project will support the Chicago Area Waterway System Advisory Committee in evaluating technical issues necessary to reach consensus on a long-term solution for preventing the movement of Asian carp and other aquatic invasive species between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River. The committee is working to reach consensus on a solution to this challenge and requires support from technical experts to evaluate issues related to water quality, flooding, transportation and AIS risk reduction. 

Board Decision Year: 2014
Great Lakes Commission (Ann Arbor) Doss, Matt (mdoss@glc.org) Completed $250,000.00
1498 Student 2 Steward

The Goundswell Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative Hub developed and implemented a web-based application to guide and assist educators through the process of high-quality place-based education knowledge acquisition. The application, Student 2 Steward is located at www.student2steward.com.

Board Decision Year: 2014
Grand Valley State University - Center For Educational Partnerships (Grand Rapids) Clift, Forrest (cliftf@gvsu.edu) Completed $71,441.00
1497 Stream and Wetland Restoration in Ulao Creek – Milwaukee Estuary AOC

Ozaukee County completed a large-scale habitat restoration project on Ulao Creek, which is a tributary to the Milwaukee River. The project team restored multiple stream reaches for maximum ecological productivity by remeandering 1,769 feet of stream channel, reconnecting 140 acres of 100 year floodplains and 14.3 acres of wetlands, as well as installing fish habitat structures.

Board Decision Year: 2014
Ozaukee County - Planning and Parks Department (Port Washington) Aho, Matt (maho@co.ozaukee.wi.us) Completed $154,923.00
1490 Pucker Street Dam Removal

This project will remove the Pucker Street dam, the most significant impairment affecting aquatic species connectivity and sediment transport on the Dowagiac River in southwest Michigan. The project will result in improved and safer access for fishing and also reconnect over 159 miles of the Dowagiac River system and 11,000 acres of wetlands to the St. Joseph River. Several fish species will benefit including salmon, steelhead, walleye, smallmouth bass and suckers.

Board Decision Year: 2014
Niles City (Niles) Hamilton, Marcy (hamiltonm@swmpc.org) Active $400,000.00
1488 Advancing Great Lakes Science and Management by Fleet Modernization and Standardization

The GLFT granted the DNR $500,000 dollars to replace the R/V Chinook that operates on Lake Huron. A new vessel will ensure continuation of long-term monitoring efforts, increase vessel efficiency, and improve surveys for inter-lake comparisons. The vessel will collaborate with other state, federal, tribal, and provincial partner agencies on predator and prey fish stock assessments. GLFT partnership with the DNR in this venture will help to ensure the continued health of a muti-species fishery worth an estimated $74 million annually. 

The final report for this project will become available after grant is officially completed in 2017.

Board Decision Year: 2014
Michigan Department of Natural Resources (Lansing) Whelan, Gary (whelang@michigan.gov) Completed $500,000.00
1480 2014 Discovering Place GLSI Incentive Grant - Next Generation Strategy

The GLFT has granted funding for a pilot project to support the development of next generation teachers and schools to advance PBE through scholarship, cross-curricular connections, and exploration of best practices for PBE in teacher training (hereby referred to as “the Next Generation strategy”). Through development of instructional techniques and support for handson learning of PBE pedagogy with pre-service teachers, this Innovation grant will support scholarship and research to advance the understanding of what is required to effectively teach students seeking to enter the teaching profession how to enact practices that are consistent with the principles of PBE. In addition, the project will advance the Hub’s goal of deepening teacher engagement and expanding teacher participation in PBE projects within school buildings currently participating in the Discovering Place (DP) hub. Finally, because the outcome is to encourage the next generation of teachers to value PBE and to develop the skills and dispositions requisite for PBE, the project will align with the 2017 GLSI goals of making PBE a central instructional strategy that is rigorous and developing, and would support long-term sustainability of PBE pedagogy. 

Board Decision Year: 2014
The Regents of the University of Michigan - U of M - Flint (Flint) Sanker, Leyla (lsanker@umflint.edu) Completed $15,922.00
1476 2014 Southeast Michigan Stewardship Coalition GLSI Incentive Grant

The Michigan Place-Based Leadership Network (MPBLN) project will support educational leaders who value the principles of Place-Based Education (PBE). Current policy and practice environments make it challenging for leaders, especially those that serve students in poverty, to create and sustain educational environments that support PBE. Leaders face significant time constraints for the planning and reflection needed to implement PBE projects. Additionally they are often isolated and have limited opportunities to share knowledge and resources with each other. The proposed leadership network (MPBLN) supports a real need of leaders that are committed to helping their students become stewards of their environment.

Board Decision Year: 2014
Eastern Michigan University - Office of Research Development (Ypsilanti) Lowenstein, Ethan (ethan.lowenstein@emich.edu) Completed $47,838.00
1472 Boardman River - Dam Removal #2

As part of the largest dam removal effort in Michigan’s history, the second of three dams will be removed on the Boardman River, a state-designated Natural River and Blue Ribbon trout stream in northern Lake Michigan. The Boardman Dam Removal Project is a signature effort that will ultimately reconnect 160 miles of prime fishery habitat, removing three dams and modifying a fourth to block invasives and provide fish passage to and from the Great Lakes.

Board Decision Year: 2014
Conservation Resource Alliance - Grandview Plaza Building (Traverse City) Beyer, Amy (amy@rivercare.org) Completed $400,000.00
1471 Restoring the Great Lakes: One Project at a Time

The goal of the 125 member Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes (HOW) Coalition is to improve the health of the Great Lakes by addressing historic threats and preparing for new challenges. HOW’s “Restoring the Great Lakes: One Project at a Time” project will provide capacity building grants to local and state non-profit organizations in eight priority areas across the Great Lakes region to help them successfully implement restoration projects through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI).

Board Decision Year: 2014
National Wildlife Federation - Great Lakes Regional Office (Ann Arbor) Hill, Jennifer (hillj@nwf.org) Completed $99,998.46
1456 Yellow perch stock assessment in drowned river mouth lakes and nearshore Lake Michigan

Yellow perch stocks have not been assessed across the full range of habitats accessible from Lake Michigan, in particular drowned river mouth (DRM) lakes. We will use genetic and otolith isotopic analyses to delineate stock structure among nine DRM lakes and four nearshore Lake Michigan sites. We will also investigate the stock identity of suspected migratory yellow perch, which potentially represent a unique life history type, that move between Lake Michigan and DRM lakes.

Board Decision Year: 2014
Grand Valley State University - Annis Water Resources Institute (Muskegon) Ruetz, Carl (ruetzc@gvsu.edu) Active $196,310.00
1455 Re-Emergence of Epizootic Epitheliotropic Disease Virus: Potential Effects & Development of Improved Diagnostics and Control Measures

Salmonid herpespesvirus 3, commonly known as Epizootic Epitheliotropic Disease Virus (EEDV) is a serious pathogen of lake trout, an indigenous species to the Great Lakes basin. With funding from the Great Lakes Fishery Trust, scientists were able to unravel some of the characteristics of EEDV by documenting two EEDV-associated epidemics in lake trout hatcheries. The study was able to sequence the full virus genome and decipher many of the genes that the genome carries; this will aid in finding potential vaccines effective against EEDV. The study also provided evidence for the host range of EEDV differences between lake trout strains. The project team was able to prepare virus-rich tissue homogenates from infected fish and used the material to standardize intraperitoneal and water-borne experimental infection protocol. The study increased the general knowledge of EEDV and has identified several targets of potential importance for developing control strategies. 

Board Decision Year: 2014
Michigan State University - Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation (East Lansing) Loch, Thomas (lochthom@cvm.msu.edu) Completed $361,150.00